Lymphangitis - Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis & Therapy

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Lymphangitis - Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis & Therapy
Lymphangitis - Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis & Therapy
Video: Lymphangitis - Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis & Therapy
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Lymphangitis

In lymphangitis, pathogens or harmful substances enter the lymphatic system and cause inflammation. The acute form is usually based on an inflamed wound, the chronic form arises from tissue changes and subsequent occlusion in the lymph vessels. Lymphangitis usually begins with a local feeling of tension, slight swelling, pain and reddening, sometimes accompanied by chills and fever.

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What are the causes of lymphangitis?

Acute lymphangitis is caused either by inflamed tissue in the immediate vicinity or by pathogens (especially staphylococci and streptococci, more rarely parasites or fungi) or harmful substances (e.g. insect and snake poisons) that have penetrated the lymphatic system directly. Chronic lymphangitis can develop from acute lymphangitis that has not healed, from defects in the lymphatic system (e.g. congestion, edema, etc.) or from surgical interventions in which parts of the lymphatic system are removed (e.g. surgery for breast cancer).

What are the symptoms of lymphangitis?

Wounds and injuries should be treated professionally at an early stage to prevent inflammation. Purulent inflammation, especially on the hands and feet, should always be taken seriously and treated by a doctor.

Lymphangitis begins with a localized feeling of tension, slight swelling, pain and redness, occasionally accompanied by chills and fever. Typical of an inflamed lymph vessel is a fuzzy, red-brown, painful stripe that develops from the wound towards the local lymph nodes within a few hours. Swelling of the lymph nodes, lymphedema, reddening of the skin, eczema and itching can also occur.

How is the diagnosis made?

Lymphangitis is usually diagnosed based on symptoms and medical history. Blood tests, ultrasound and computed tomography can help determine the exact spectrum of pathogens and the underlying causes.

How is lymphangitis treated?

Acute lymphangitis is usually treated with antibiotics. In addition, the affected part of the body should be kept calm and cool. Disinfectant compresses as well as anti-inflammatory ointments help heal. At the same time, the treatment of the wound serving as the entry portal is important. If lymphedema occurs as part of chronic lymphangitis, it should be treated quickly and comprehensively.

Whom can I ask?

If you suspect lymphangitis, you should contact a general practitioner as early as possible to avoid serious complications.

How are the costs going to be covered?

All necessary and appropriate therapies are covered by the health insurance carriers. Your doctor or the outpatient clinic will generally settle accounts directly with your health insurance provider. With certain health insurance providers, however, you may have to pay a deductible (BVAEB, SVS, SVS, BVAEB). However, you can also use a doctor of your choice (ie doctor without a health insurance contract) or a private outpatient clinic. For more information, see Costs and Deductibles.

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