Diet And Breastfeeding - What You Should Consider - Diet While Breastfeeding

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Diet And Breastfeeding - What You Should Consider - Diet While Breastfeeding
Diet And Breastfeeding - What You Should Consider - Diet While Breastfeeding
Video: Diet And Breastfeeding - What You Should Consider - Diet While Breastfeeding
Video: Ask the Expert: Eating While Breastfeeding 2023, February
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Diet while breastfeeding

The energy and nutrient requirements are increased during breastfeeding. To ensure that mother and child are well looked after, a varied diet that meets their needs is important. A sufficient supply of fluids is also important. Some foods should be on the menu every day or often when breastfeeding, others have no place in this phase of life.

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  • How much is the additional requirement during breastfeeding?
  • What specific dietary recommendations are there for breastfeeding women?
  • Video: Eat right during pregnancy and breastfeeding
  • Which foods should be avoided during breastfeeding?
  • Video: What shouldn't be eaten during pregnancy and breastfeeding?
  • What should breastfeeding women look out for?

While breastfeeding you can eat anything that was well tolerated during pregnancy. A varied diet is ideal. This is the best way to ensure the care of mother and child.

The need for many vitamins and minerals is also increased during breastfeeding. Proper food choices and adequate hydration are essential and will help meet your needs.

How much is the additional requirement during breastfeeding?

The additional energy requirement during breastfeeding, if only breastfeeding is used, is the same as in the last third of pregnancy (28th to 40th week of pregnancy). The guide value for the energy supply is an additional 500 kcal per day for exclusive breastfeeding in the first four to six months. This amount of energy is contained, for example, in two slices of wholemeal bread with cheese and ham and ¼ cucumber, an apple and a small handful of nuts. For partial breastfeeding after the first four to six months, an additional 525 kcal per day are required.

Due to the milk production, the need for protein is increased, resulting in a recommended additional intake of 23 grams per day. With a combination of low-fat animal and vegetable protein sources (e.g. legumes and grains) this additional requirement can be covered well.

During breastfeeding, the fat intake can be increased to 35 energy percent. Care should be taken to supply high-quality oils. High-quality vegetable oils include rapeseed, linseed, walnut and soybean oil. Fish such as salmon, herring, trout and char provide high-quality animal fat.

The need for some vitamins and minerals is increased during breastfeeding. During this time, you should pay particular attention to the supply of:

  • Folic Acid: Mainly in green vegetables and whole grain cereal products.
  • Further vitamins of the B group as well as vitamins A, C and E with antioxidant effects.
  • Iron: Especially in animal products such as meat and fish. Plant foods such as whole grains and legumes also contain iron.
  • Zinc: Animal foods as well as whole grains are good sources.
  • Iodine: Sea fish is a good source of iodine. Tuna, swordfish, halibut and pike should be avoided out of caution because of the possible heavy metal contamination. Iodized table salt is an important source of iodine in iodine-deficient areas.
  • Phosphorus: Good suppliers are milk and dairy products, meat, fish and grain.
  • Magnesium: Abundant in whole grain products as well as milk and dairy products.

For more information, see Vitamins and Minerals.

What specific dietary recommendations are there for breastfeeding women?

A special diet is not necessary during breastfeeding. With a varied and needs-based choice of food according to the Austrian food pyramid for pregnant and breastfeeding women, the additional needs can be well covered.

  • Drinks: Drink enough and regularly. Ideal drinks are water, mineral water, unsweetened fruit teas and highly diluted fruit and vegetable juices in a ratio of 1: 3. It is advisable to have a drink ready when breastfeeding - even at night.
  • Fruit, vegetables and legumes: three servings of vegetables or legumes and two servings of fruit a day.
  • Bread, pasta, potatoes and co.: Four servings of cereals, bread, pasta, rice or potatoes, preferably made from whole grain, every day.
  • Milk and milk products: three servings of milk and milk products such as yogurt, curd cheese and cheese every day. The lower-fat variant should be preferred.
  • High-quality vegetable oils: To meet the requirement for essential fatty acids, one to two tablespoons of high-quality vegetable oils, nuts and seeds should be eaten daily.

    Spreadable, baking and frying fats as well as high-fat dairy products such as whipped cream, sour cream or crème fraîche should be used sparingly.

  • Meat, sausage, fish and eggs: One to two servings of fish, three servings of lean meat or lean sausage and up to three eggs per week.
  • Sweets, snacks and high-energy drinks rarely.

Video: Eat right during pregnancy and breastfeeding

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Which foods should be avoided during breastfeeding?

Consuming certain foods can increase the risk of food infections. In addition, harmful ingredients can be absorbed by the baby through breast milk. Therefore, the following foods should not be consumed or only in small quantities during breastfeeding:

  • No alcohol and nicotine.
  • Caffeine only in moderation: a maximum of two to three medium-sized cups of coffee or a maximum of four cups of black or green tea.

    Caution: Energy drinks, lemonades and iced tea also contain caffeine.

  • No raw or incompletely cooked meat such as carpaccio and beef tartare.
  • No raw milk or raw milk products (labeling on food: “made with raw milk”) or boil before use.
  • No soft or mold cheeses.
  • No raw eggs or foods that contain raw eggs (e.g. tiramisu, mayonnaise) or half-cooked eggs (e.g. breakfast egg, fried egg).
  • No raw sausages (eg salami), offal, smoked and pickled fish (eg gravlax) or raw seafood or raw fish (eg sushi, oysters); Predatory fish such as tuna, swordfish, halibut or pike are to be avoided because of possible heavy metal contamination.
  • No unheated frozen berries or sprouts.

Note Careful kitchen hygiene will help prevent food infections and the transmission of harmful substances to the child.

Video: What shouldn't be eaten during pregnancy and breastfeeding?

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What should breastfeeding women look out for?

  • Create variety! A varied diet changes the smell and taste of breast milk. Therefore the taste formation of the child is promoted.
  • Prevent Flatulence? Many babies suffer from flatulence, and the causes can be many. However, there is currently no verified data that certain foods the mother ate cause gas in the child. Breastfeeding women should therefore not avoid certain foods such as fruits and vegetables as a precaution. These provide valuable ingredients. If a food is suspected of causing flatulence in the child, it can be temporarily omitted and the baby's reaction observed.
  • Stimulate the formation of milk volume through food? The formation of breast milk cannot be stimulated by consuming certain foods. In principle: the extent of breast emptying stimulates milk production more than the frequency of application.
  • Quickly regain your original weight? In principle, those pounds that were gained during pregnancy can be lost again while breastfeeding. Too rapid weight loss, e.g. through dieting, is not recommended.

You can find healthy recipes for breastfeeding mothers in the brochure of the Ministry of Health and the Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety (AGES): Proper nutrition from the start.

Further information is available from:

  • Eat right from the start!
  • Diet during pregnancy and breastfeeding
  • Baby-friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI)
  • Infant feeding
  • Breastfeeding - a healthy start in life

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