Swiss Chard - Healthy Recipes And More

Table of contents:

Swiss Chard - Healthy Recipes And More
Swiss Chard - Healthy Recipes And More
Video: Swiss Chard - Healthy Recipes And More
Video: Swiss Chard 101 2023, February
Anonim

Swiss chard

Chard emerged from the shadow of spinach a long time ago and has many fans because of its more intense taste. It offers added value as its stems can be used like asparagus. Swiss chard is not only available in green, certain varieties have yellow or purple-violet leaves or bright red stems. Domestic chard is available from May to November…

navigation

  • Continue reading
  • more on the subject
  • Botany
  • ingredients
  • Use and preparation
  • storage

Botany

Swiss chard (Beta vulgaris var. Flavescens = stem / rib chard / var. Vulgaris = leaf chard), belongs to the goosefoot family (Chenopodiaceae), which also includes spinach and beetroot. It is available in many different colors and shapes, the leaves can be from yellow to light and dark green to purple-violet, the stems from white to bright red. A distinction is made between leaf and stem chard. The thickened leaf stalks of the stem chard (also: rib or stem chard) can be used like asparagus.

ingredients

Swiss chard contains among other things vitamin C and B vitamins. It also contains high amounts of vitamin A precursors (carotenoids). Swiss chard also provides the minerals calcium, magnesium and iron. Similar to spinach, Swiss chard stores nitrate, which is converted into nitrite when heated several times and kept warm for a long time. As a further consequence, nitrosamines which are harmful to health can develop. Swiss chard should therefore be eaten or cooled as soon as possible after preparation and not reheated several times. The simultaneous presence of vitamin C can inhibit the formation of nitrosamines.

Swiss chard contains oxalic acid which, if taken in excess, can negatively affect bone metabolism and lead to the formation of kidney stones. It can cause gastrointestinal problems in sensitive people. However, if you eat Swiss chard in moderation, this is not a problem.

Ingredients

Swiss chard

per 100 g edible

portion, raw

Ingredients

Swiss chard

per 100 g edible

portion, raw

Energy (kcal) 14th Iron (mg) 2.7
Fat (g) 0.3 Vitamin A (µg) 588
Protein (g) 2.1 Vitamin B1 (mg) 0.09
Carbohydrates (g) 0.7 Vitamin B2 (mg) 0.16
Dietary fiber (g) 2 Niacin (mg) 0.6
Potassium (mg) 376 Vitamin B6 (mg) 0.09
Calcium (mg) 103 Vitamin C (mg) 39
Magnesium (mg) 81 Vitamin E (mg) 1.5
Folic acid (µg) 30th

Use and preparation

Leaves and stems are suitable for consumption. The leaves are prepared and used in a similar way to spinach. Before processing, the Swiss chard is washed thoroughly under running water and any earth residue is removed. Steamed, it is suitable as an accompaniment to meat and fish dishes. It can be added to or cooked in vegetable dishes such as strudel, filled pancakes, but also in casseroles, stews or soups. The stems can be used like asparagus or black salsify.

With long-handled chard, leaves and stems are separated from each other, as the stems take about twice as long to cook depending on their thickness. To do this, the stems are separated from the leaves in a wedge shape.

Note When shopping, ensure that the cut surface is fresh. The leaves and stems should not be brown or withered.

storage

Swiss chard should be processed quickly. Wrapped in a damp cloth, it can be kept in the refrigerator for about three days. It is well suited for freezing; it is briefly blanched in hot water beforehand and can then be frozen in portions.

Popular by topic