Jerusalem Artichoke - Healthy Recipes And More

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Jerusalem Artichoke - Healthy Recipes And More
Jerusalem Artichoke - Healthy Recipes And More

Video: Jerusalem Artichoke - Healthy Recipes And More

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Video: Jerusalem artichokes! This root will blow you away! 2023, January
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Jerusalem artichoke

In recent years the tuber fruit Jerusalem artichoke has experienced a renaissance and has conquered kitchens with its nutty taste. The taste of the Jerusalem artichoke tuber is slightly nutty to sweet and is reminiscent of artichokes and chestnuts. Jerusalem artichoke can also be eaten raw. The bowl is also suitable for consumption, but it can cause digestive problems in sensitive people…

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  • more on the subject
  • Botany
  • ingredients
  • Use and preparation
  • storage

Botany

Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) belongs to the sunflower family (Asteraceae) and is related to the sunflower (Helianthus annuus). The one to three meter high perennial forms yellow flowers and has subterranean runners that end in elongated, spindle-shaped or round, potato-sized tubers. The shape and color of the edible tubers depend on the variety and range from beige-brown to purple-brown. The color of the flesh can be whitish-beige to yellow to brownish. The appearance of the tuber is somewhat reminiscent of the ginger tuber.

Jerusalem artichoke is also known under the names earth artichoke, earth pear, earth sunflower, bulbous sunflower and Indian tuber. Jerusalem artichoke was introduced from North America to Europe at the beginning of the 17th century, but was gradually displaced by the potato. Jerusalem artichoke tubers can be harvested from autumn until they sprout again in spring and are available from local cultivation from October to March - primarily at vegetable markets.

Note Jerusalem artichoke varieties are Topstar (white, pear-shaped), Gigant and Lola (round, reddish).

ingredients

Jerusalem artichoke has a low calorie content of approx. 30 kcal / 100 g, but is very filling due to the high fiber content. The fiber content is many times higher than that of potatoes - Jerusalem artichoke: 12.1 g / 100 g, potatoes: 2.1 g / 100 g. Jerusalem artichoke contains the fiber inulin, which is not digestible for the human organism. Inulin has a positive effect on digestion, but excessive consumption can lead to digestive problems such as flatulence or diarrhea. Jerusalem artichoke contains vitamin A, vitamin B1, vitamin B2 and niacin. The contents of the minerals iron, potassium and calcium are significantly higher compared to potatoes.

Jerusalem artichoke

ingredients

per 100 g of edible

portion, raw

Jerusalem artichoke

ingredients

per 100 g of edible

portion, raw

Energy (kcal) 30th Magnesium (mg) 20th
Fat (g) 0.4 Iron (mg) 3.7
Protein (g) 2.4 Vitamin A (µg) 2
Carbohydrates (g) 4.0 Vitamin B1 (mg) 0.2
Dietary fiber (g) 12.1 Vitamin B2 (mg) 0.06
Potassium (mg) 480 Niacin (mg) 1.3
Calcium (mg) 10 Vitamin C (mg) 4th

Use and preparation

The taste of the Jerusalem artichoke tuber is slightly nutty to sweet and is reminiscent of artichokes and chestnuts. The tuber is versatile and, in contrast to the potato, can also be eaten raw. The nutty taste of Jerusalem artichoke comes out more strongly with cooked or roasted tubers. The raw tuber is crunchy and has a slightly earthy taste.

The bowl is suitable for consumption, but it can cause digestive problems in sensitive people. To avoid discoloration of the raw, peeled tuber, it can be placed in lemon water. The peel is easier to remove when blanched. The cooking time in the oven as a whole tuber is about 30 to 45 minutes, boiled in water about ten minutes (cut into cubes in a little water) or fried in slices five to seven minutes. Jerusalem artichoke can be combined well with herbs such as parsley, tarragon, marjoram or mint. Spices such as nutmeg, mustard and horseradish underline its nutty taste. Lemon also goes well with Jerusalem artichoke.

Use of Jerusalem artichoke in the kitchen:

  • grated or grated in salads (raw)
  • in soups or sauces
  • in various vegetable dishes such as casseroles or roasted dishes
  • as a substitute for potatoes (e.g. as a puree)
  • as an accompaniment to a wide variety of dishes

Note Roasted Jerusalem artichoke can be used as a coffee substitute.

storage

Jerusalem artichoke is winter-proof and can withstand temperatures down to minus 15 degrees. It can therefore be harvested through the winter on frost-free days. The tubers should be stored in a cool and dark place. Jerusalem artichokes can be kept for four to five days in the vegetable compartment of the refrigerator.

Note Wrap tubers in a damp cloth to store them in the refrigerator.

For more information, see Herbs & Spices.

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