First Aid - Wounds - Abrasions - Cut

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First Aid - Wounds - Abrasions - Cut
First Aid - Wounds - Abrasions - Cut

Video: First Aid - Wounds - Abrasions - Cut

Отличия серверных жестких дисков от десктопных
Video: How to Treat Cuts and Grazes - First Aid Training - St John Ambulance 2023, January
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First aid: wounds

Small skin injuries such as abrasions, cuts or small stab wounds are common and mostly harmless. They can be cared for by laypeople and usually heal within ten days without any problems. The right first aid measures can protect the wound from infection and aid healing.

Large or deep injuries, such as deep cuts or lacerations, require rapid medical treatment. The earlier a wound is treated professionally, for example by a doctor, the faster it can heal. The formation of scars can also be kept as low as possible.

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  • First aid for wounds: what should you watch out for?
  • How are minor grazes and grazes treated?
  • How are cuts and lacerations treated?
  • What is a pressure bandage? How do you put it on?
  • First aid measures in the event of profuse bleeding
  • ">When do wounds need medical attention?
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In the case of heavily bleeding injuries, an important first aid measure is to stop the bleeding to prevent excessive blood loss. Animal bites also require prompt medical treatment due to the high risk of infection.

A wound (trauma) is caused by damage, destruction or severing of the skin and the underlying tissue. This allows germs to penetrate the injury and cause infections in the wound. Infected wounds can lead to blood poisoning (sepsis) without appropriate treatment.

First aid for wounds: what should you watch out for?

Before treating a wound, clean your hands. Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and clean water or use hand sanitizer if available. You can also wear sterile disposable latex gloves for first aid. On the one hand, you protect yourself against infections caused by blood contact; on the other hand, you protect the injured person from germs that are on their hands. Do not touch the wound with bare, unsterile fingers to avoid the transmission of germs.

Note It is important to check the vaccination protection of the injured person against tetanus (tetanus), eg in the vaccination certificate. If in doubt, consult a doctor to check your vaccination protection and, if necessary, to refresh it.

How are minor grazes and grazes treated?

  • Carefully rinse the wound with clean water (drinking water) or wound irrigation solution.
  • Examine for dirt or foreign matter in the wound. Try to remove larger pieces of dirt, stones, splinters, etc. with disinfected or sterile tweezers. Get medical attention quickly if you cannot remove foreign matter from the wound.
  • If necessary, apply a thin layer of an antiseptic wound ointment or a wound gel to the wound to keep it moist and also to protect it from infections.
  • Small scratches or abrasions can heal openly. Larger abrasions should be protected with a bandage. It is important to ensure that this does not stick to the healing wound and that the wound is damaged when the dressing is changed.
  • Change the dressing daily or as required depending on the dressing material.
  • Check the wound regularly for signs of infection (redness, swelling, pain, fever).

How are cuts and lacerations treated?

  • Let the wound bleed briefly. This flushes small pieces of dirt out of the wound.
  • Rinse soiled wounds with clean water or wound irrigation solution.
  • Try to remove larger pieces of dirt or foreign objects with disinfected or sterile tweezers. Get medical help if you cannot remove foreign matter from the wound.
  • If the bleeding doesn't stop by itself, press a sterile compress or clean cloth over the wound for about five to ten minutes.
  • Elevate the affected part of the body.
  • Once the bleeding has stopped, apply a thin layer of antiseptic ointment or wound gel to the wound to keep it moist and clean.
  • Close the wound with a plaster or sterile dressing, e.g. from your medicine cabinet. The wound heals better if the wound edges are close together.
  • Change the dressing daily or as needed depending on the dressing material, and inspect the wound for signs of infection.
  • Deep, gaping cuts or lacerations as well as wounds on the head must be treated by a doctor and possibly closed, for example with sewing, staples or wound glue.
  • If the bleeding cannot be stopped, a pressure bandage must be applied. Call the ambulance (144)!

What is a pressure bandage? How do you put it on?

  • First place a sterile compress on the bleeding wound and wrap it with a gauze bandage once or twice.
  • Place a pressure body, for example an unopened bandage pack, on the wound area and continue to wrap it tightly with the gauze bandage.
  • Then stick the end of the gauze bandage with adhesive tape.

First aid measures in the event of profuse bleeding

In the event of an emergency of heavy bleeding as a result of a vascular injury: Squeeze the supplying blood vessel with your finger. Large blood loss can quickly lead to shock. Reassure the injured person and take control of their condition.

Danger! If you are unconscious, do an emergency check-up.

When do wounds need medical attention?

Small, superficial abrasions, cuts or small wounds can be treated by laypeople themselves. However, medical treatment is indicated:

  • if the vaccination against tetanus (tetanus) is not given or unsafe, as well as with
  • Wounds from which dirt cannot be removed,
  • Wounds with bleeding that cannot be stopped
  • large, gaping wounds and deep wounds in which all layers of the skin have been severed and which cannot be adequately cared for by laypeople,
  • Bite wounds (because of the high risk of infection),
  • Eye injuries,
  • Stab wounds,
  • Injuries to the genitals,
  • non-healing, chronic wounds and
  • Wounds showing signs of infection.

In these cases, the wound should be examined and treated by a doctor as quickly as possible. If the wound is treated later, it may no longer be possible to treat it by closing it, for example by suturing or gluing it.

When using a disinfectant, keep the following in mind:

  • The disinfectant must be suitable for wound disinfection.
  • Pay attention to any allergies (e.g. iodine allergy).
  • Hydrogen peroxide or iodine are not recommended for cleaning wounds as they can irritate the wound.
  • The disinfectant must not have expired.

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